Employment Rate Rhode Island Jobs April 2019

Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI), April 2019: The Consequences of Treading Water

In an unusual circumstance 11 of the 12 datapoints used for the RI Center for Freedom & Prosperity’s Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI) were updated for April, and the end result was not a happy one. RI overtook Louisiana in 2017 to claim the 47th rank in the country after five years at 48. For the month of April, RI has lost that gain, despite improved numbers by five measures.

Employment was not one of those five, down another 269 people from the first-reported number for March, and the labor force dropped yet another 1,009. Jobs based within the state represented a bright spot, with an increase of 5,400. Alternate measures of unemployment gave RI two more positive developments, with long-term unemployment down 600 and marginal attachment to the labor force down 200. However, this seems likely to have been caused by worker exits. This more-negative interpretation is justified by the fact that people who are involuntarily working part time increased by 1,100.

On the welfare side, the Ocean State had 5,209 fewer people on Medicaid, which is positive. However, enrollment in TANF (welfare) was up 407, and the state still cannot manage to update its SNAP (food stamps) data, which haven’t moved since February 2017. The taxation picture is mixed. The federal government collected almost $200 million less from Rhode Islanders, but state and local taxation increased by $41 million.

The first chart shows RI remaining last in New England on JOI, at 48th. New Hampshire leads the region, in 3rd place, nationally. Vermont fell two spots, to 14th place, while Maine held steady in 18th. Massachusetts also remained in place, at 36th, but Connecticut dropped two, to 44th.

Race To First Place Jobs & Opportunity Index  Rhode Island, New England Jobs April 2019

The second chart shows the gaps between RI and New England and the United States on JOI, and the third chart shows the gaps in the official unemployment rate. RI’s gap improved slightly in all cases.

Scores on Jobs & Opportunity Index- Rhode Island, New England, United States Jobs April 2019
Unemployment Rate Jobs & Opportunity Index- Rhode Island, New England, United States Jobs April 2019

Results for the three underlying JOI factors were:

  • Job Outlook Factor (optimism that adequate work is available): RI fell four spots, to 28th.
  • Freedom Factor (the level of work against reliance on welfare programs): RI fell six spots, to 48th.
  • Prosperity Factor (the financial motivation of income versus taxes): RI remained 47th.

Click here for the corresponding employment situation post on the Ocean State Current.

Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI), March 2019: In Need of a Turnaround… Soon

Although its rank did not change, March was not a good month for Rhode Island on the RI Center for Freedom & Prosperity’s Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI). With four of the 12 datapoints’ changing, RI is still 47th in the country, but slippage in employment and income brings a warning sign of things that might be yet to come.

Employment was down another 521 people from the first-reported number for Feburary, and the labor force dropped 1,234. Jobs based within the state showed an increase of 300, but the prior number has since been revised up, so the official news is no change.

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) released quarterly data for personal income in each state, and Rhode Island is the only one to show a decrease from the first-reported number for the prior quarter. We should note, however, that the numbers from last quarter have been revised down enough that the decrease actually shows as an increase in the official data.

We should also note that Rhode Island remains the only state that is unable to report estimates for monthly enrollment in the federal SNAP program (foodstamps). Until this problem is repaired, we will simply hold Rhode Island’s enrollment at the last-reported level, which is from February 2017.

The first chart shows RI remaining last in New England on JOI, at 47th. In New England, New Hampshire leads the region, in 3rd place, nationally. Vermont fell a spot, to 12th place, while Maine held steady in 18th. Massachusetts and Connecticut also held their positions, at 36th and 42nd, respectively

Rhode Island Jobs March 2019 New England Race To National First Place

The second chart shows the gaps between RI and New England and the United States on JOI, and the third chart shows the gaps in the official unemployment rate. RI’s gap improved slightly in all cases.

Rhode Island Jobs March 2019 New England Scores on Jobs & Opportunity Index
Rhode Island Unemployment Rate, Jobs March 2019, New England Jobs & Opportunity Index

Results for the three underlying JOI factors were:

  • Job Outlook Factor (optimism that adequate work is available): RI remained 24th.
  • Freedom Factor (the level of work against reliance on welfare programs): RI remained 42nd.
  • Prosperity Factor (the financial motivation of income versus taxes): RI remained 47th.

Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI), February 2019: Employment and Jobs Turn Down

Given the short time between reports, only three of the 12 datapoints of the RI Center for Freedom & Prosperity’s Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI) have changed for February, but the changes are important. After a disappointing downward revision of Rhode Island’s employment data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) wiped away most of the employment progress Rhode Islanders had made in 2018, February showed an additional downturn. That downturn didn’t change the index ranking or the subrankings, so the Ocean State is still 47th in the country.

Employment was down another 570 people from the first-reported number for January, and the labor force dropped 951. An additional 1,400 jobs based within the state joined the 9,000 that disappeared the month before.

The first chart shows RI remaining last in New England on JOI. Although underlying scores moved, the three measures that changed did not cause any variation in rank from the month before across the country.

In New England, New Hampshire leads the region, in 3rd place, nationally. Vermont remained in 12th place, and Maine in 18th. Massachusetts is still 36th, and Connecticut stands at 42nd.

New England Jobs February 2019 Race To First Place

The second chart shows the gaps between RI and New England and the United States on JOI, both staying about the same. That was true of the third chart, also, which shows the gaps in the official unemployment rate.

United States Jobs February 2019 Scores
Unemployment Rate Rhode Island Jobs February 2019

Results for the three underlying JOI factors were:

  • Job Outlook Factor (optimism that adequate work is available): RI remained 24th.
  • Freedom Factor (the level of work against reliance on welfare programs): RI remained 42nd.
  • Prosperity Factor (the financial motivation of income versus taxes): RI remained 47th.

See here for the corresponding post focusing on employment from the Ocean State Current.

Jobs & Opportunity Index November 2018 update- employment down 190 from the first-reported number for October, labor force dropped 208. RI in 47th place.

Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI), November 2018: Employment and Income Diverging

November’s data for the RI Center for Freedom & Prosperity’s Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI) paints a bit of a mixed picture. The Ocean State is still 47th in the country, with seven of the 12 datapoints in the index updated. (Rhode Island remains the only state not updating its SNAP [food stamp] data, thanks to UHIP, although positive news suggest this may soon change.)

Employment was down 190 people from the first-reported number for October, and the labor force dropped 208. The number of jobs in the state also dropped, by 400. Turning to the financial results that make up JOI’s Prosperity Factor, total personal income in Rhode Island increased by an annualized $359 million from the prior number, while state and local tax collections increased $71 million. On the hopeful side, the number of Rhode Islanders relying on Medicaid decreased by 1,490 enrollees.

The first chart shows RI remaining last in New England. New Hampshire leads the region, in 3rd place, nationally. Vermont held 13th place, but Maine lost the step it had taken last month and fell back to 16th. Massachusetts and Connecticut both remained in place at 36th and 40th, respectively.

The second chart shows the gaps between RI and both New England and the United States on JOI, which both increased in November. The third chart shows the gaps in the official unemployment rate, which both decreased slightly.

Results for the three underlying JOI factors were:

  • Job Outlook Factor (optimism that adequate work is available): RI remained 26th.
  • Freedom Factor (the level of work against reliance on welfare programs): RI remained 41st.
  • Prosperity Factor (the financial motivation of income versus taxes): RI remained 47th.

October 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index: More Slipping as the Weather Cools

The Rhode Island Center for Freedom & Prosperity’s Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI) reports have been noting for a while that the state’s economy hasn’t been living up to the hype. October didn’t change that story. The Ocean State is still 47th in the country, with nine of the 12 datapoints in the index updated, and the indicators suggest Rhode Islanders are growing skeptical of improvement. (Note that Rhode Island remains the only state not updating its SNAP [food stamp] data, thanks to UHIP.)

Employment was up a tiny 50 people from the first-reported number for September. Meanwhile, the labor force dropped 685, people unemployed for more than 15 weeks went up by 700, and those who are only able to find part-time work increased by 1,600. To balance that a little, the number of jobs in the state went up by 1,000, while 200 fewer Rhode Islanders said they were only marginally attached to the employment market. Of course, that may be because they completely gave up. The discouraging results for labor force and alternative employment measures were enough to cause a nine-place drop for the ocean state in the Job Outlook Factor.

At the same time, the number of Rhode Islanders relying on Medicaid went up 736 enrollees. The TANF (welfare) data was finally updated after more than a year and showed that the numbers had decreased by 920. We should emphasize, however, that this data still lags considerably, reflecting the results from June.

The first chart shows RI last in New England. New Hampshire leads the region, in 3rd place, nationally. Vermont held 13th place, but Maine advanced a step to 15th. Massachusetts slipped one, to 36th, while Connecticut stumbled two spots, to 40th.

October 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index

The second chart shows the gap between RI and New England and the United States on October 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index. The third chart shows the gaps in the official unemployment rate.

October 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index October 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index

Results for the three underlying October 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index factors were:

  • Job Outlook Factor (optimism that adequate work is available): RI dropped to 26th.
  • Freedom Factor (the level of work against reliance on welfare programs): RI remained 41st.
  • Prosperity Factor (the financial motivation of income versus taxes): RI remained 47th.

September 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index

September 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI): And Back Down Again

As somewhat expected, an update to income numbers lost Rhode Island its improved rank on the September 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI) from the Rhode Island Center for Freedom & Prosperity, bringing the Ocean State back to 47th in the country. Six of the 12 datapoints in the index were updated for September, although Rhode Island remains the only state not updating its SNAP (food stamp) data, due to the UHIP debacle.

Employment was up from the first-reported number for July by a small 170 people, while the labor force actually dropped 319. In keeping with these results, RI-based jobs came in exactly the same for September, after having dropped significantly the month before.

Unfortunately, the number of Rhode Islanders relying on Medicaid went in the opposite direction, following a drop last month with an increase of 439 enrollees. When it comes to SNAP, the inability to update the numbers may be hurting Rhode Island, inasmuch as 45 states saw a reduction in this benefit, which registers as a positive for the index. Meanwhile, annualized personal income was up 4%, which wasn’t enough to prevent the Ocean State from losing ground compared with other states.

The Ocean State saw no change in any of the subfactors that go into its overall JOI ranking. The drop in place to 47th resulted from New York’s 6% increase in income.

The first chart shows RI last in New England. New Hampshire leads the region, with 3rd place, nationally. Vermont was steady at 13th, while Maine held 16th. Massachusetts also did not move, from 35th, but Connecticut managed to gain a spot, to 38th.

The second chart shows the gap between RI and New England and the United States on JOI. The third chart shows the gaps in the official unemployment rate.

Unemployment Rate Rhode Island

September 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index

Results for the three underlying September 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index factors were:

  • Job Outlook Factor (optimism that adequate work is available): RI remained 17th.
  • Freedom Factor (the level of work against reliance on welfare programs): RI remained 41st.
  • Prosperity Factor (the financial motivation of income versus taxes): RI remained 47th.

Click here for the corresponding employment post on the Ocean State Current.

Jobs & Opportunity Index August 2018 brought an apparent improvement in Rhode Island’s ranking to 46th in the country, largely as a result of decreasing state and local tax revenue.

Jobs & Opportunity Index August 2018: Less for Rhode Island Is More (Unfortunately)

August brought an apparent improvement in Rhode Island’s Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI) ranking from the RI Center for Freedom & Prosperity, to 46th in the country, largely as a result of decreasing state and local tax revenue. Of the five (of 12) datapoints that were updated for August, four were positive, from JOI’s perspective, with a negative for jobs based in the state.

Employment was up from the first-reported number for July by 1,001, while labor force was up 256. The larger growth of employment than labor force translated into a drop of the unemployment rate to 4.0%. The growth in labor force was much smaller, this month, which may be related to the fact that RI-based jobs decreased by 1,900. Back on the positive side, however, was the 1,419 drop in Medicaid enrollment and $191 million reduction in state and local taxes. This last point may be too early to celebrate. Before next month’s JOI report, numbers should be updated for Rhode Islanders’ income, and if less income was the cause of the lower taxation, the net effect would not be an indicator of health.

The Ocean State saw no change in any of the subfactors that go into its overall JOI ranking. The jump in place to 46th resulted from New York’s falling behind with a drop in jobs and an increase in state and local taxes.

The first chart shows RI last in New England. New Hampshire leads the region, with 3rd place, nationally. Vermont jumped past Maine, moving eight spots to 13th while Maine moved up only one spot, to 16th; note, though, that this results from Vermont’s nation-leading loss in state and local revenue, so income numbers may reverse its progress. Massachusetts held at 35th, and Connecticut fell two spots, to 39th.

Jobs & Opportunity Index August 2018 race to first

The second chart shows the gap between RI and New England and the United States on JOI. The third chart shows the gaps in the official unemployment rate.

Jobs & Opportunity Index August 2018 New England, And U.S.A. Scores

Jobs & Opportunity Index August 2018 Unemployment Rate

Results for the three underlying Jobs & Opportunity Index August 2018 factors were:

  • Job Outlook Factor (optimism that adequate work is available): RI remained 17th.
  • Freedom Factor (the level of work against reliance on welfare programs): RI remained 41st.
  • Prosperity Factor (the financial motivation of income versus taxes): RI remained 47th.

Click here for the corresponding employment post on the Ocean State Current.

On the July 2018 Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI), Rhode Island remains in 47th place in the country.

Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI), July 2018: Quiet Month in Search of a Boom

July found Rhode Island still in 47th place on the RI Center for Freedom & Prosperity’s Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI). Of the seven (of 12) datapoints that were updated for the June report, only one was not from the Bureau of Labor Statistics jobs and employment research. Medicaid enrollment was also the only negative marker.

Employment was up from the first-reported number for June by 1,784, while labor force was up 1,082. The larger growth of employment than labor force translated into a drop of the unemployment rate to 4.2%. RI-based jobs increased by 1,400. Also positive were the three alternative measures of employment included in the index. The number of Rhode Islanders who say that they have been unemployed for more than 15 weeks was down by 400 since number last reported. Those saying that they are working part time, but would rather work full time, were down by 1,300. Meanwhile, those who consider themselves “marginally attached” to the labor force held at 4,200. One slightly negative note came with Medicaid enrollment, which increased 197.

Given the improvements in the alternative employment measures, along with the growing labor force, Rhode Island’s rank on the Job Outlook Factor improved from 22nd to 17th. This factor measures Rhode Islanders’ feeling about whether work is available and counts less than the other two factors.

The first chart shows RI still in the last position in New England, 47th in the country. New Hampshire still leads the region, with 3rd place, nationally. Maine slipped two spots, from 15th to 17th, while Vermont remained 21st. Likewise, Massachusetts fell from 34th to 35th, while Connecticut remained 37th.

The second chart shows the gap between RI and New England and the United States on JOI. The third chart shows the gaps in the official unemployment rate.

Results for the three underlying JOI factors were:

  • Job Outlook Factor (optimism that adequate work is available): RI climbed five spots to 17th.
  • Freedom Factor (the level of work against reliance on welfare programs): RI remained 41st.
  • Prosperity Factor (the financial motivation of income versus taxes): RI remained 47th.

Click here for the corresponding employment post on the Ocean State Current.

Jobs & Opportunity Index June 2018

Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI), June 2018: Employment Without Profit

Rhode Island’s 47th place ranking on the Rhode Island Center for Freedom & Prosperity’s Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI) remains intact. However, of the seven (of 12) datapoints that were updated for the June report, only the three related to Bureau of Labor Statistics jobs and employment research were positive. Additionally, SNAP (foodstamp) data remains unchanged for Rhode Island because of “system reporting issues” since January 2017.

On the positive side, employment was up from the first-reported number for May by 1,631, while labor force was up 860. The larger growth of employment than labor force translated into a drop of the unemployment rate to 4.3%. RI-based jobs increased by 2,100.

On the negative side, Medicaid enrollment increased 956. Annualized personal income (including investments) fell $307 million, while state and local taxes increased $53 million. Rhode Islnad was one of only four states to see personal income actually fall with the latest report.

These discouraging results, however, were not enough to bring down any sub-index rankings, and the Freedom Factor went up (see below).

The first chart shows RI still in the last position in New England, 47th on the in the country on the Jobs & Opportunity Index June 2018. New Hampshire still leads the region, but fell to 3rd place, nationally, with Utah joining Wyoming in the top 2. Every other New England state held steady, with Maine at 15th, Vermont at 21st, Massachusetts at 34th, and Connecticut at 37th.

Jobs & Opportunity Index June 2018

The second chart shows the gap between RI and New England and the United States on JOI. The third chart shows the gaps in the official unemployment rate. In all cases, the Ocean State lost ground.

Jobs & Opportunity Index June 2018

Results for the three underlying JOI factors were:

  • Job Outlook Factor (optimism that adequate work is available): RI remained 22nd.
  • Freedom Factor (the level of work against reliance on welfare programs): RI improved one place,
    to 41st.
  • Prosperity Factor (the financial motivation of income versus taxes): RI remained 47th.

Click here for the corresponding employment post on the Ocean State Current.