Rhode Island lawmakers - female and male - experienced first-hand the safety and fun of natural hair braiding at a cultural exhibition yesterday at the State House.

Center Commends Senators Who Enjoyed a Safe State House Hair Braid

Lawmakers Experience the Safe Practice of Natural Hair Braiding

RI Freedom Braiders Hold Successful Art Exhibit and Braiding Demonstration at Statehouse

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Providence, RI — Rhode Island lawmakers – female and male – experienced first-hand the safety and fun of natural hair braiding at a cultural exhibition yesterday at the State House.

Senators Jabour, Morgan, Felag, Euer, and Conley, among other lawmakers, had stylish braids safely woven with their own hair.

The Rhode Island Center for Freedom & Prosperity believes women who practice this art form should have the #RightToEarn a living without permission from the government to work.

After many states have acted in recent years to remove licensing burdens for natural hair braiding, Rhode Island remains among a minority of states that still maintain such onerous laws.

House bill H7565 and Senate Bill S2323, which were heard earlier this year in the House Corporations and Senate Commerce committees, respectively, would exempt natural hair braiders from the requirement to be licensed as hairdressers or cosmeticians, while also defining the safe practice of natural hair braiding.

In 2017, similar legislation unanimously passed the House, but was not taken up in the Senate.

“There are no chemicals or sharp tools involved in this twisting of hair art form,” commented Mike Stenhouse, CEO for the Center, who had an extension twisted into his own hair. “Without any evidence of actual consumer harm, this licensing burden is prohibitive to many people who would prefer to start new careers and earn paychecks instead of receiving welfare checks.”

In a major report by the Center – The RIght to Earn a Living – issued in January, Rhode Island was cited as ranking as one of the 10 most onerously burdened states when it comes to occupational licensing. Additionally our state already suffers from bottom 10 rankings on the Family Prosperity Index (FPI), overall business climate, and on Jobs & Opportunity Index (JOI).

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